API Reference

Accessor (A)

class django_tables2.utils.Accessor[source]

A string describing a path from one object to another via attribute/index accesses. For convenience, the class has an alias A to allow for more concise code.

Relations are separated by a . character.

RequestConfig

class django_tables2.config.RequestConfig(request, paginate=True)[source]

A configurator that uses request data to setup a table.

A single RequestConfig can be used for multiple tables in one view.

Parameters:paginate (dict or bool) –

Indicates whether to paginate, and if so, what default values to use. If the value evaluates to False, pagination will be disabled. A dict can be used to specify default values for the call to paginate (e.g. to define a default per_page value).

A special silent item can be used to enable automatic handling of pagination exceptions using the following logic:

Table

class django_tables2.tables.Table(data, order_by=None, orderable=None, empty_text=None, exclude=None, attrs=None, row_attrs=None, pinned_row_attrs=None, sequence=None, prefix=None, order_by_field=None, page_field=None, per_page_field=None, template=None, default=None, request=None, show_header=None, show_footer=True, extra_columns=None)[source]

A representation of a table.

Parameters:
  • data (queryset, list of dicts) – The data to display.
  • order_by – (tuple or str): The default ordering tuple or comma separated str. A hyphen - can be used to prefix a column name to indicate descending order, for example: ('name', '-age') or name,-age.
  • orderable (bool) – Enable/disable column ordering on this table
  • empty_text (str) – Empty text to render when the table has no data. (default Table.Meta.empty_text)
  • exclude (iterable or str) – The names of columns that shouldn’t be included in the table.
  • attrs (dict) – HTML attributes to add to the <table> tag. When accessing the attribute, the value is always returned as an AttributeDict to allow easily conversion to HTML.
  • row_attrs – Add custom html attributes to the table rows. Allows custom HTML attributes to be specified which will be added to the <tr> tag of the rendered table.
  • pinned_row_attrs – Same as row_attrs but for pinned rows.
  • sequence (iterable) –

    The sequence/order of columns the columns (from left to right).

    Items in the sequence must be column names, or '...' (string containing three periods). '...' can be used as a catch-all for columns that aren’t specified.

  • prefix (str) – A prefix for querystring fields. To avoid name-clashes when using multiple tables on single page.
  • order_by_field (str) – If not None, defines the name of the order by querystring field in the url.
  • page_field (str) – If not None, defines the name of the current page querystring field.
  • per_page_field (str) – If not None, defines the name of the per page querystring field.
  • template (str) – The template to render when using {% render_table %} (default 'django_tables2/table.html')
  • default (str) – Text to render in empty cells (determined by Column.empty_values, default Table.Meta.default)
  • request – Django’s request to avoid using RequestConfig
  • show_header (bool) – If False, the table will not have a header (<thead>), defaults to True
  • show_footer (bool) – If False, the table footer will not be rendered, even if some columns have a footer, defaults to True.
  • extra_columns (str, Column) – list of (name, column)-tuples containing extra columns to add to the instance.
as_html(request)

Render the table to an HTML table, adding request to the context.

as_values(exclude_columns=None)

Return a row iterator of the data which would be shown in the table where the first row is the table headers.

Parameters:exclude_columns (iterable) – columns to exclude in the data iterator.

This can be used to output the table data as CSV, excel, for example using the ExportMixin.

If a column is defined using a Table.render_foo methods, the returned value from that method is used. If you want to differentiate between the rendered cell and a value, use a value_Foo-method:

class Table(tables.Table):
    name = tables.Column()

    def render_name(self, value):
        return format_html('<span class="name">{}</span>', value)

    def value_name(self, value):
        return value

will have a value wrapped in <span> in the rendered HTML, and just returns the value when as_values() is called.

before_render(request)

A way to hook into the moment just before rendering the template.

Can be used to hide a column.

Parameters:request – contains the WGSIRequest instance, containing a user attribute if django.contrib.auth.middleware.AuthenticationMiddleware is added to your MIDDLEWARE_CLASSES.

Example:

class Table(tables.Table):
    name = tables.Column(orderable=False)
    country = tables.Column(orderable=False)

    def before_render(self, request):
        if request.user.has_perm('foo.delete_bar'):
            self.columns.hide('country')
        else:
            self.columns.show('country')
get_bottom_pinned_data()

Return data for bottom pinned rows containing data for each row. Iterable type like: queryset, list of dicts, list of objects. Having a non-zero number of pinned rows will not result in an empty resultset message being rendered, even if there are no regular data rows

Returns:None (default) no pinned rows at the bottom, iterable, data for pinned rows at the bottom.

Note

To show pinned row this method should be overridden.

Example

>>> class TableWithBottomPinnedRows(Table):
...     def get_bottom_pinned_data(self):
...         return [{
...             'column_a' : 'some value',
...             'column_c' : 'other value',
...         }]
get_column_class_names(classes_set, bound_column)

Returns a set of HTML class names for cells (both td and th) of a bound column in this table. By default this returns the column class names defined in the table’s attributes, and additionally the bound column’s name. This method can be overridden to change the default behavior, for example to simply return classes_set.

Parameters:
  • classes_set (set of string) – a set of class names to be added to the cell, retrieved from the column’s attributes. In the case of a header cell (th), this also includes ordering classes. To set the classes for a column, see Column. To configure ordering classes, see Changing class names for ordered column headers
  • bound_column (BoundColumn) – the bound column the class names are determined for. Useful for accessing bound_column.name.
Returns:

A set of class names to be added to cells of this column

get_column_class_names(classes_set, bound_column)

Returns a set of HTML class names for cells (both td and th) of a bound column in this table. By default this returns the column class names defined in the table’s attributes, and additionally the bound column’s name. This method can be overridden to change the default behavior, for example to simply return classes_set.

Parameters:
  • classes_set (set of string) – a set of class names to be added to the cell, retrieved from the column’s attributes. In the case of a header cell (th), this also includes ordering classes. To set the classes for a column, see Column. To configure ordering classes, see Changing class names for ordered column headers
  • bound_column (BoundColumn) – the bound column the class names are determined for. Useful for accessing bound_column.name.
Returns:

A set of class names to be added to cells of this column

get_top_pinned_data()

Return data for top pinned rows containing data for each row. Iterable type like: queryset, list of dicts, list of objects. Having a non-zero number of pinned rows will not result in an empty resultset message being rendered, even if there are no regular data rows

Returns:None (default) no pinned rows at the top, iterable, data for pinned rows at the top.

Note

To show pinned row this method should be overridden.

Example

>>> class TableWithTopPinnedRows(Table):
...     def get_top_pinned_data(self):
...         return [{
...             'column_a' : 'some value',
...             'column_c' : 'other value',
...         }]
paginate(klass=<class ‘django.core.paginator.Paginator’>, per_page=None, page=1, *args, **kwargs)

Paginates the table using a paginator and creates a page property containing information for the current page.

Parameters:
  • klass (Paginator) – A paginator class to paginate the results.
  • per_page (int) – Number of records to display on each page.
  • page (int) – Page to display.

Extra arguments are passed to the paginator.

Pagination exceptions (EmptyPage and PageNotAnInteger) may be raised from this method and should be handled by the caller.

Table.Meta

class Table.Meta

Provides a way to define global settings for table, as opposed to defining them for each instance.

For example, if you want to create a table of users with their primary key added as a data-id attribute on each <tr>, You can use the following:

class UsersTable(tables.Table):
    class Meta:
        row_attrs = {'data-id': lambda record: record.pk}

Which adds the desired row_attrs to every instance of UsersTable, in contrast of defining it at construction time:

table = tables.Table(User.objects.all(),
                     row_attrs={'data-id': lambda record: record.pk})

Some settings are only available in Table.Meta and not as an argument to the Table constructor.

Note

If you define a class Meta on a child of a table already having a class Meta defined, you need to specify the parent’s Meta class as the parent for the class Meta in the child:

class PersonTable(table.Table):
    class Meta:
        model = Person
        exclude = ('email', )

class PersonWithEmailTable(PersonTable):
    class Meta(PersonTable.Meta):
        exclude = ()

All attributes are overwritten if defined in the child’s class Meta, no merging is attempted.

Arguments:
attrs (dict): Add custom HTML attributes to the table.

Allows custom HTML attributes to be specified which will be added to the <table> tag of any table rendered via Table.as_html() or the render_table template tag.

This is typically used to enable a theme for a table (which is done by adding a CSS class to the <table> element):

class SimpleTable(tables.Table):
    name = tables.Column()

    class Meta:
        attrs = {'class': 'paleblue'}

If you supply a a callable as a value in the dict, it will be called at table instatiation an de returned value will be used:

Consider this example where each table gets an unieque "id" attribute:

import itertools
counter = itertools.count()

class UniqueIdTable(tables.Table):
    name = tables.Column()

    class Meta:
        attrs = {'id': lambda: 'table_%d' % next(counter)}

Note

This functionality is also available via the attrs keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

row_attrs (dict): Add custom html attributes to the table rows.

Allows custom HTML attributes to be specified which will be added to the <tr> tag of the rendered table.

This can be used to add each record’s primary key to each row:

class PersonTable(tables.Table):
    class Meta:
        model = Person
        row_attrs = {'data-id': lambda record: record.pk}

# will result in
'<tr data-id="1">...</tr>'

New in version 1.2.0.

Note

This functionality is also available via the row_attrs keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

empty_text (str): Defines the text to display when the table has no rows.

If the table is empty and bool(empty_text) is True, a row is displayed containing empty_text. This is allows a message such as There are currently no FOO. to be displayed.

Note

This functionality is also available via the empty_text keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

show_header (bool): Wether or not to show the table header.

Defines whether the table header should be displayed or not, by default, the header shows the column names.

Note

This functionality is also available via the show_header keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

exclude (typle or str): Exclude columns from the table.

This is useful in subclasses to exclude columns in a parent:

>>> class Person(tables.Table):
...     first_name = tables.Column()
...     last_name = tables.Column()
...
>>> Person.base_columns
{'first_name': <django_tables2.columns.Column object at 0x10046df10>,
'last_name': <django_tables2.columns.Column object at 0x10046d8d0>}
>>> class ForgetfulPerson(Person):
...     class Meta:
...         exclude = ('last_name', )
...
>>> ForgetfulPerson.base_columns
{'first_name': <django_tables2.columns.Column object at 0x10046df10>}

Note

This functionality is also available via the exclude keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

However, unlike some of the other Table.Meta options, providing the exclude keyword to a table’s constructor won’t override the Meta.exclude. Instead, it will be effectively be added to it. i.e. you can’t use the constructor’s exclude argument to undo an exclusion.

fields (tuple or str): Fields to show in the table.

Used in conjunction with model, specifies which fields should have columns in the table. If None, all fields are used, otherwise only those named:

# models.py
class Person(models.Model):
    first_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    last_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)

# tables.py
class PersonTable(tables.Table):
    class Meta:
        model = Person
        fields = ('first_name', )
model (django.core.db.models.Model): Create columns from model.

A model to inspect and automatically create corresponding columns.

This option allows a Django model to be specified to cause the table to automatically generate columns that correspond to the fields in a model.

order_by (tuple or str): The default ordering tuple or comma separated str.

A hyphen - can be used to prefix a column name to indicate descending order, for example: ('name', '-age') or name,-age.

Note

This functionality is also available via the order_by keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

sequence (iterable): The sequence of the table columns.

This allows the default order of columns (the order they were defined in the Table) to be overridden.

The special item '...' can be used as a placeholder that will be replaced with all the columns that weren’t explicitly listed. This allows you to add columns to the front or back when using inheritance.

Example:

>>> class Person(tables.Table):
...     first_name = tables.Column()
...     last_name = tables.Column()
...
...     class Meta:
...         sequence = ('last_name', '...')
...
>>> Person.base_columns.keys()
['last_name', 'first_name']

The '...' item can be used at most once in the sequence value. If it’s not used, every column must be explicitly included. e.g. in the above example, sequence = ('last_name', ) would be invalid because neither '...' or 'first_name' were included.

Note

This functionality is also available via the sequence keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

orderable (bool): Default value for column’s orderable attribute.

If the table and column don’t specify a value, a column’s orderable value will fallback to this. This provides an easy mechanism to disable ordering on an entire table, without adding orderable=False to each column in a table.

Note

This functionality is also available via the orderable keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

template (str): The default template to use when rendering the table.

Note

This functionality is also available via the template keyword argument to a table’s constructor.

localize (str or tuple): Specifies which fields should be localized in the
table. Read Controlling localization for more information.
unlocalize (str or tuple): Specifies which fields should be unlocalized in
the table. Read Controlling localization for more information.

Columns

Column

class django_tables2.columns.Column(verbose_name=None, accessor=None, default=None, visible=True, orderable=None, attrs=None, order_by=None, empty_values=None, localize=None, footer=None, exclude_from_export=False)[source]

Represents a single column of a table.

Column objects control the way a column (including the cells that fall within it) are rendered.

Parameters:
  • attrs (dict) –

    HTML attributes for elements that make up the column. This API is extended by subclasses to allow arbitrary HTML attributes to be added to the output.

    By default Column supports:

    • thtable/thead/tr/th elements
    • tdtable/tbody/tr/td elements
    • cell – fallback if th or td isn’t defined
  • accessor (str or Accessor) – An accessor that describes how to extract values for this column from the table data.
  • default (str or callable) –

    The default value for the column. This can be a value or a callable object [1]. If an object in the data provides None for a column, the default will be used instead.

    The default value may affect ordering, depending on the type of data the table is using. The only case where ordering is not affected is when a QuerySet is used as the table data (since sorting is performed by the database).

  • empty_values (iterable) – list of values considered as a missing value, for which the column will render the default value. Defaults to (None, '')
  • exclude_from_export (bool) – If True, this column will not be added to the data iterator returned from as_values().
  • footer (str, callable) – Defines the footer of this column. If a callable is passed, it can take optional keyword argumetns column, bound_colun and table.
  • order_by (str, tuple or Accessor) – Allows one or more accessors to be used for ordering rather than accessor.
  • orderable (bool) – If False, this column will not be allowed to influence row ordering/sorting.
  • verbose_name (str) – A human readable version of the column name.
  • visible (bool) – If True, this column will be rendered.
  • localize

    If the cells in this column will be localized by the localize filter:

    • If True, force localization
    • If False, values are not localized
    • If None (default), localization depends on the USE_L10N setting.
[1]The provided callable object must not expect to receive any arguments.
order(queryset, is_descending)[source]

Returns the queryset of the table.

This method can be overridden by table.order_FOO() methods methods on the table or by subclassing Column; but only overrides if second element in return tuple is True.

Returns:Tuple (queryset, boolean)
render(value)[source]

Returns the content for a specific cell.

This method can be overridden by Table.render_foo methods methods on the table or by subclassing Column.

If the value for this cell is in empty_values, this method is skipped and an appropriate default value is rendered instead. Subclasses should set empty_values to () if they want to handle all values in render.

value(**kwargs)[source]

Returns the content for a specific cell similarly to render however without any html content. This can be used to get the data in the formatted as it is presented but in a form that could be added to a csv file.

The default implementation just calls the render function but any subclasses where render returns html content should override this method.

See LinkColumn for an example.

BooleanColumn

class django_tables2.columns.BooleanColumn(null=False, yesno=u’u2714, u2718’, **kwargs)[source]

A column suitable for rendering boolean data.

Parameters:
  • null (bool) – is None different from False?
  • yesno (str) – text to display for True/False values, comma separated

Rendered values are wrapped in a <span> to allow customisation by themes. By default the span is given the class true, false.

In addition to attrs keys supported by Column, the following are available:

  • span – adds attributes to the <span> tag

CheckBoxColumn

class django_tables2.columns.CheckBoxColumn(attrs=None, checked=None, **extra)[source]

A subclass of Column that renders as a checkbox form input.

This column allows a user to select a set of rows. The selection information can then be used to apply some operation (e.g. “delete”) onto the set of objects that correspond to the selected rows.

The value that is extracted from the table data for this column is used as the value for the checkbox, i.e. <input type="checkbox" value="..." />

This class implements some sensible defaults:

  • HTML input’s name attribute is the column name (can override via attrs argument).
  • orderable defaults to False.
Parameters:
  • attrs (dict) –

    In addition to attrs keys supported by Column, the following are available:

    • input<input> elements in both <td> and <th>.
    • th__input – Replaces input attrs in header cells.
    • td__input – Replaces input attrs in body cells.
  • checked (Accessor, bool, callable) – Allow rendering the checkbox as checked. If it resolves to a truthy value, the checkbox will be rendered as checked.

Note

You might expect that you could select multiple checkboxes in the rendered table and then do something with that. This functionality is not implemented. If you want something to actually happen, you will need to implement that yourself.

is_checked(value, record)[source]

Determine if the checkbox should be checked

DateColumn

class django_tables2.columns.DateColumn(format=None, short=True, *args, **kwargs)[source]

A column that renders dates in the local timezone.

Parameters:
  • format (str) – format string in same format as Django’s date template filter (optional)
  • short (bool) – if format is not specified, use Django’s SHORT_DATE_FORMAT setting, otherwise use DATE_FORMAT

DateTimeColumn

class django_tables2.columns.DateTimeColumn(format=None, short=True, *args, **kwargs)[source]

A column that renders datetimes in the local timezone.

Parameters:
  • format (str) – format string for datetime (optional). Note that format uses Django’s date template tag syntax.
  • short (bool) – if format is not specified, use Django’s SHORT_DATETIME_FORMAT, else DATETIME_FORMAT

EmailColumn

class django_tables2.columns.EmailColumn(attrs=None, text=None, *args, **kwargs)[source]

Render email addresses to mailto-links.

Parameters:
  • attrs (dict) – HTML attributes that are added to the rendered <a href="...">...</a> tag
  • text – Either static text, or a callable. If set, this will be used to render the text inside link instead of the value

Example:

# models.py
class Person(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    email =  models.EmailField()

# tables.py
class PeopleTable(tables.Table):
    name = tables.Column()
    email = tables.EmailColumn()

# result
# [...]<a href="mailto:email@example.com">email@example.com</a>

FileColumn

class django_tables2.columns.FileColumn(verify_exists=True, **kwargs)[source]

Attempts to render FieldFile (or other storage backend File) as a hyperlink.

When the file is accessible via a URL, the file is rendered as a hyperlink. The basename is used as the text:

<a href="/media/path/to/receipt.pdf" title="path/to/receipt.pdf">receipt.pdf</a>

When unable to determine the URL, a span is used instead:

<span title="path/to/receipt.pdf">receipt.pdf</span>

Column.attrs keys a and span can be used to add additional attributes.

Parameters:
  • verify_exists (bool) – attempt to determine if the file exists If verify_exists, the HTML class exists or missing is added to the element to indicate the integrity of the storage.
  • text (str or callable) – Either static text, or a callable. If set, this will be used to render the text inside the link instead of the file’s basename (default)

JSONColumn

class django_tables2.columns.JSONColumn(json_dumps_kwargs=None, **kwargs)[source]

Render the contents of JSONField or HStoreField as an indented string.

New in version 1.5.0.

Note

Automatic rendering of data to this column requires PostgreSQL support (psycopg2 installed) to import the fields, but this column can also be used manually without it.

Parameters:
  • json_dumps_kwargs – kwargs passed to json.dumps, defaults to {'indent': 2}
  • attrs (dict) –

    In addition to attrs keys supported by Column, the following are available:

    • pre<pre> around the rendered JSON string in <td> elements.

LinkColumn

class django_tables2.columns.LinkColumn(viewname=None, urlconf=None, args=None, kwargs=None, current_app=None, attrs=None, **extra)[source]

Renders a normal value as an internal hyperlink to another page.

It’s common to have the primary value in a row hyperlinked to the page dedicated to that record.

The first arguments are identical to that of reverse and allows an internal URL to be described. If this argument is None, then get_absolute_url. (see Django references) will be used. The last argument attrs allows custom HTML attributes to be added to the rendered <a href="..."> tag.

Parameters:
  • viewname (str) – See reverse, or use None to use the model’s get_absolute_url
  • urlconf (str) – See reverse.
  • args (list) – See reverse. [2]
  • kwargs (dict) – See reverse. [2]
  • current_app (str) – See reverse.
  • attrs (dict) – HTML attributes that are added to the rendered <a ...>...</a> tag.
  • text (str or callable) – Either static text, or a callable. If set, this will be used to render the text inside link instead of value (default). The callable gets the record being rendered as argument.
[2](1, 2) In order to create a link to a URL that relies on information in the current row, Accessor objects can be used in the args or kwargs arguments. The accessor will be resolved using the row’s record before reverse is called.

Example:

# models.py
class Person(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=200)

# urls.py
urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url('people/(\d+)/', views.people_detail, name='people_detail')
)

# tables.py
from django_tables2.utils import A  # alias for Accessor

class PeopleTable(tables.Table):
    name = tables.LinkColumn('people_detail', args=[A('pk')])

In order to override the text value (i.e. <a ... >text</a>) consider the following example:

# tables.py
from django_tables2.utils import A  # alias for Accessor

class PeopleTable(tables.Table):
    name = tables.LinkColumn('people_detail', text='static text', args=[A('pk')])
    age  = tables.LinkColumn('people_detail', text=lambda record: record.name, args=[A('pk')])

In the first example, a static text would be rendered (‘static text’) In the second example, you can specify a callable which accepts a record object (and thus can return anything from it)

In addition to attrs keys supported by Column, the following are available:

  • a<a> elements in <td>.

Adding attributes to the <a>-tag looks like this:

class PeopleTable(tables.Table):
    first_name = tables.LinkColumn(attrs={
        'a': {'style': 'color: red;'}
    })
compose_url(record, *args, **kwargs)[source]

Compose the url if the column is constructed with a viewname.

ManyToManyColumn

class django_tables2.columns.ManyToManyColumn(transform=None, filter=None, *args, **kwargs)[source]

Display the list of objects from a ManyRelatedManager

Parameters:
  • transform – callable to transform each item to text, it gets an item as argument and must return a string-like representation of the item. By default, it calls force_text on each item.
  • filter – callable to filter, limit or order the QuerySet, it gets the ManyRelatedManager as first argument and must return. By default, it returns all()`

For example, when displaying a list of friends with their full name:

# models.py
class Person(models.Model):
    first_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    last_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    friends = models.ManyToManyField(Person)

    @property
    def name(self):
        return '{} {}'.format(self.first_name, self.last_name)

# tables.py
class PersonTable(tables.Table):
    name = tables.Column(order_by=('last_name', 'first_name'))
    friends = tables.ManyToManyColumn(transform=lamda user: u.name)
filter(qs)[source]

Filter is called on the ManyRelatedManager to allow ordering, filtering or limiting on the set of related objects.

transform(obj)[source]

Transform is applied to each item of the list of objects from the ManyToMany relation.

RelatedLinkColumn

class django_tables2.columns.RelatedLinkColumn(viewname=None, urlconf=None, args=None, kwargs=None, current_app=None, attrs=None, **extra)[source]

Render a link to a related object using related object’s get_absolute_url, same parameters as ~.LinkColumn

TemplateColumn

class django_tables2.columns.TemplateColumn(template_code=None, template_name=None, **extra)[source]

A subclass of Column that renders some template code to use as the cell value.

Parameters:
  • template_code (str) – template code to render
  • template_name (str) – name of the template to render

A Template object is created from the template_code or template_name and rendered with a context containing:

  • record – data record for the current row
  • value – value from record that corresponds to the current column
  • default – appropriate default value to use as fallback

Example:

class ExampleTable(tables.Table):
    foo = tables.TemplateColumn('{{ record.bar }}')
    # contents of `myapp/bar_column.html` is `{{ value }}`
    bar = tables.TemplateColumn(template_name='myapp/name2_column.html')

Both columns will have the same output.

value(**kwargs)[source]

The value returned from a call to value() on a TemplateColumn is the rendered tamplate with django.utils.html.strip_tags applied.

URLColumn

class django_tables2.columns.URLColumn(attrs=None, text=None, *args, **kwargs)[source]

Renders URL values as hyperlinks.

Parameters:
  • text (str or callable) – Either static text, or a callable. If set, this will be used to render the text inside link instead of value (default)
  • attrs (dict) – Additional attributes for the <a> tag

Example:

>>> class CompaniesTable(tables.Table):
...     www = tables.URLColumn()
...
>>> table = CompaniesTable([{'www': 'http://google.com'}])
>>> table.rows[0].get_cell('www')
'<a href="http://google.com">http://google.com</a>'

Views and view mixins

SingleTableMixin

class django_tables2.views.SingleTableMixin[source]

Adds a Table object to the context. Typically used with TemplateResponseMixin.

table_class

subclass of Table

table_data

data used to populate the table, any compatible data source.

context_table_name

str – name of the table’s template variable (default: ‘table’)

table_pagination

dict – controls table pagination. If a dict, passed as the paginate keyword argument to RequestConfig. As such, any Truthy value enables pagination. (default: enable pagination)

This mixin plays nice with the Django’s`.MultipleObjectMixin` by using get_queryset` as a fallback for the table data source.

get_context_data(**kwargs)[source]

Overriden version of TemplateResponseMixin to inject the table into the template’s context.

get_table(**kwargs)[source]

Return a table object to use. The table has automatic support for sorting and pagination.

get_table_data()[source]

Return the table data that should be used to populate the rows.

get_table_kwargs()[source]

Return the keyword arguments for instantiating the table.

Allows passing customized arguments to the table constructor, for example, to remove the buttons column, you could define this method in your View:

def get_table_kwargs(self):
    return {
        'exclude': ('buttons', )
    }

MultiTableMixin

class django_tables2.views.MultiTableMixin[source]

Adds a Table object to the context. Typically used with TemplateResponseMixin.

the tables attribute must be either a list of Table instances or classes extended from Table which are not already instantiated. In that case, tables_data must be defined, having an entry containing the data for each table in tables.

tables

list of Table instances or list of Table child objects.

tables_data

if defined, tables is assumed to be a list of table classes which will be instatiated with the corresponding item from this list of TableData instances.

table_prefix

str – Prefix to be used for each table. The string must contain one instance of {}, which will be replaced by an integer different for each table in the view. Default is ‘table_{}-‘.

context_table_name

str – name of the table’s template variable (default: ‘tables’)

New in version 1.2.3.

SingleTableView

class django_tables2.views.SingleTableView(**kwargs)[source]

Generic view that renders a template and passes in a Table instances.

get_table(**kwargs)

Return a table object to use. The table has automatic support for sorting and pagination.

get_table_kwargs()

Return the keyword arguments for instantiating the table.

Allows passing customized arguments to the table constructor, for example, to remove the buttons column, you could define this method in your View:

def get_table_kwargs(self):
    return {
        'exclude': ('buttons', )
    }

export.TableExport

class django_tables2.export.TableExport(export_format, table, exclude_columns=None)[source]

Export data from a table to the filetype specified.

Argumenents:
export_format (str): one of csv, json, latex, ods, tsv, xls, xlsx, yml table (Table): instance of the table to export the data from exclude_columns (iterable): list of column names to exclude from the export
content_type()[source]

Returns the content type for the current export format

export()[source]

Returns the string/bytes for the current export format

classmethod is_valid_format(export_format)[source]

Returns true if export_format is one of the supported export formats

response(filename=None)[source]

Builds and returns a HttpResponse containing the exported data

Parameters:filename (str) – if not None,

export.ExportMixin

class django_tables2.export.ExportMixin[source]

Support various export formats for the table data.

ExportMixin looks for some attributes on the class to change it’s behaviour:

export_trigger_param

str – is the name of the GET attribute used to trigger the export. It’s value decides the export format, refer to TableExport for a list of available formats.

excude_columns

iterable – column names excluded from the export. For example, one might want to exclude columns containing buttons from the export. Excluding columns from the export is also possible using the exclude_from_export argument to the Column constructor:

class Table(tables.Table):
    name = tables.Column()
    buttons = tables.TemplateColumn(exclude_from_export=True, template_name=...)

See Internal APIs for internal classes.