Customizing headers and footers

By default an header and no footer will be rendered.

Adding column headers

The header cell for each column comes from header. By default this method returns verbose_name, falling back to the titlised attribute name of the column in the table class.

When using queryset data and a verbose name hasn’t been explicitly defined for a column, the corresponding model field’s verbose_name will be used.

Consider the following:

>>> class Region(models.Model):
...     name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
...
>>> class Person(models.Model):
...     first_name = models.CharField(verbose_name='model verbose name', max_length=200)
...     last_name = models.CharField(max_length=200)
...     region = models.ForeignKey('Region')
...
>>> class PersonTable(tables.Table):
...     first_name = tables.Column()
...     ln = tables.Column(accessor='last_name')
...     region_name = tables.Column(accessor='region.name')
...
>>> table = PersonTable(Person.objects.all())
>>> table.columns['first_name'].header
'Model Verbose Name'
>>> table.columns['ln'].header
'Last Name'
>>> table.columns['region_name'].header
'Name'

As you can see in the last example (region name), the results are not always desirable when an accessor is used to cross relationships. To get around this be careful to define Column.verbose_name.

Changing class names for ordered column headers

When a column is ordered in an ascending state there needs to be a way to show it in the interface. django-tables2 does this by adding an asc class for ascending or a desc class for descending. It should also be known that any orderable column is added with an orderable class to the column header.

Sometimes there may be a need to change these default classes.

On the attrs attribute of the table, you can add a th key with the value of a dictionary. Within that th dictionary, you may add an _ordering key also with the value of a dictionary.

The _ordering element is optional and all elements within it are optional. Inside you can have an orderable element, which will change the default orderable class name. You can also have ascending which will will change the default asc class name. And lastly, you can have descending which will change the default desc class name.

Example:

class Table(tables.Table):
    Meta:
        attrs = {
            'th' : {
                '_ordering': {
                    'orderable': 'sortable', # Instead of `orderable`
                    'ascending': 'ascend',   # Instead of `asc`
                    'descending': 'descend'  # Instead of `desc`
                }
            }
        }

It can also be specified at initialization using the attrs for both: table and column:

ATTRIBUTES = {
    'th' : {
        '_ordering': {
            'orderable': 'sortable', # Instead of `orderable`
            'ascending': 'ascend',   # Instead of `asc`
            'descending': 'descend'  # Instead of `desc`
        }
    }
}

table = tables.Table(queryset, attrs=ATTRIBUTES)

# OR

class Table(tables.Table):
    my_column = tables.Column(attrs=ATTRIBUTES)

Adding column footers

By default, no footer will be rendered. If you want to add a footer, define a footer on at least one column.

That will make the table render a footer on every view of the table. It’s up to you to decide if that makes sense if your table is paginated.